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Archive for the ‘Engine and Drivetrain’ Category

X Pipe

May 30th, 2010 No comments

I am installing a Dr Gas Crossover Pipe. This will help equalize the pressure between the 2 sides of the exhaust. This should add a bit of torque, and also quiet the exhaust down a little. I got the measurements from Scott on where exactly it needed to be (and not be) to optimize the torque curve. Amazingly, I’ve been able to nail the placement of the center of the X very close to ideal, about 35.9 inches from the ends of the primaries inside the header. This got a little interesting, because since the primaries on the left and right are different lengths, the collectors are different lengths as well.

I pulled a rookie move when I welded the center section together – I welded it all on one side and then the other. MIG gets really hot, so the metal warped a bit and threw off my nice fitment job.  I muscled it into place anyway. Hopefully that will work out.

new exhaust - IMG_7434.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7434.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7435.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7435.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7436.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7436.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7437.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7437.JPG

Headers

May 26th, 2010 No comments

I ditched the old Doug Thorley headers because they wouldn’t work with my new motor. Too bad, because they were nicely made. I bought a set of Hooker Super Comp headers, part number 6111-HKR and have set about modifying them a bit. I ground out the tubes to match my heads’ exhaust ports, had the flange re-welded on the outside instead of just the inside, and am modifying the collectors.

The primaries on the left side are all within about .5″ of each other in length – impressive! On the right side, tubes 2-4 are close to each other, but a couple inches shorter than the left. Tube 1 is almost 5 inches longer than 2-4! It’s the best I can do, I guess. Hooker says they are “tuned” equal length primaries. I guess “equal” is relative. True equal length headers would cost a lot more. Tough to make.

To make up for the difference between left and right, I’m extending the collector .7″. The left-hand collector needs to be 18.2 past the ends of the primaries and the right hand needs to be 18.9. It’s not really possible to get very exact with it, because the ends of the primaries really vary (+- 1/8 or more). But, I’m getting real close.

Making the exhaust system is fun and challenging. I’m sore from lifting pipes into place over my head, fitting, removing, cutting pipe, lifting into place, etc. The headers are a real tight fit. The driver’s side one has to go in first. I have to lift the engine and move it over towards the passenger’s side in order for the pipes to clear the steering box and shock tower on the way in. Luckily I did install some Ron Morris engine mounts that allow for side to side and front to back adjustment. So, lift, move, put the header up and a couple bolts in, then shift the motor back to center and drop it. Then install the passenger’s side. It all has to be done multiple times in the fitting process.

headers - IMG_7271.JPG
headers - IMG_7271.JPG
headers - IMG_7272.JPG
headers - IMG_7272.JPG
I ground out the tubes to match the large exhaust ports of my AFR heads
I ground out the tubes to match the large exhaust ports of my AFR heads
I had my engine builder, Bob Gromm, TIG the flanges on the outside with phosphor bronze. This makes them strong, and seals up the thin areas left by my grinding
I had my engine builder, Bob Gromm, TIG the flanges on the outside with phosphor bronze. This makes them strong, and seals up the thin areas left by my grinding
This is the stock collector that comes with the Hooker Super Comp 6111-HKR. It's too short and too big for my application.
This is the stock collector that comes with the Hooker Super Comp 6111-HKR. It's too short and too big for my application.
I cut and deburred the collector and prepared it for welding
I cut and deburred the collector and prepared it for welding
This is the header next to my new collector pipe. The new pipe has a slightly smaller ID, which should be better for my torque curve.
This is the header next to my new collector pipe. The new pipe has a slightly smaller ID, which should be better for my torque curve.
I ground the edges of this down a bit because it's a thicker gauge than the old collector and I thought they should match up.
I ground the edges of this down a bit because it's a thicker gauge than the old collector and I thought they should match up.
tacking the new collector to the old. I cut off a piece of the reducer to use as a joining band
tacking the new collector to the old. I cut off a piece of the reducer to use as a joining band
headers - IMG_7432.JPG
headers - IMG_7432.JPG
new collectors with ball and cone adapters, tacked together
new collectors with ball and cone adapters, tacked together
headers - IMG_7439.JPG
headers - IMG_7439.JPG
headers - IMG_7440.JPG
headers - IMG_7440.JPG
headers - IMG_7441.JPG
headers - IMG_7441.JPG

Engine assembled

March 27th, 2010 No comments

Dad and I went over to Ray’s for the final engine assembly. We made a couple mistakes. First, we forgot to install the fuel pump eccentric! No matter, it forces me to go electric, which will be great. Second, we didn’t realize that htis type of lifter needs to be installed before the heads. oops. Otherwise, the assembly went great and the motor looks good.

The dial indicator helps us find top dead center
The dial indicator helps us find top dead center
finding TDC
finding TDC
The windage tray goes on. We had to machine these holes to fit. It seems that everything needs customization.
The windage tray goes on. We had to machine these holes to fit. It seems that everything needs customization.
Dad puts on the head for the first time. I'm putting molybdenum disulphide on the head bolt washers so that they have a smooth bearing surface.
Dad puts on the head for the first time. I'm putting molybdenum disulphide on the head bolt washers so that they have a smooth bearing surface.
Initial torque. We torqued the head bolts in 3 steps.
Initial torque. We torqued the head bolts in 3 steps.
final torque
final torque
2010 - IMG_7124.JPG
2010 - IMG_7124.JPG
lifters, pushrods, and rockers are in
lifters, pushrods, and rockers are in
2010 - IMG_7129.JPG
2010 - IMG_7129.JPG
looking good!
looking good!
2010 - IMG_7133.JPG
2010 - IMG_7133.JPG

Categories: Engine and Drivetrain Tags:

Transmission Linkage Rebuild

March 25th, 2010 No comments

One of the things about my old transmission was the sloppy shifting. Anyone who drove it could tell you,  you never really knew for sure if you’d shifted into a particular gear. Well, I bought a new Hurst Competition Plus shifter, part number 391 3180, and took it over to Ray’s. We took apart the old linkage and cut the rods to the proper lengths. Then, we threaded the ends and installed heim joints. Where new bushings were needed, Ray machined some new ones out of stainless steel on his lathe. Then, he took apart the Hurst and made shims for every gear. This process basically took out all of the slop and left me with a REALLY nice shifter.

This is the old shifter - an old Hurst style one, but not the right one for this transmission.
This is the old shifter - an old Hurst style one, but not the right one for this transmission.
2010-01-26 13.52.36
2010-01-26 13.52.36
trans - 2010-01-26%2B13.37.50.jpg
trans - 2010-01-26%2B13.37.50.jpg
You can see how the attachment is made between the rods and the transmission arms - the rod makes a 90 degree turn into that hole. There are plastic bushings (teflon?) that smooth the joint out, and the rods are then secured with a spring clip.
You can see how the attachment is made between the rods and the transmission arms - the rod makes a 90 degree turn into that hole. There are plastic bushings (teflon?) that smooth the joint out, and the rods are then secured with a spring clip.
We replaced the old sloppy joints with really nice solid heim joints that took out all the slop
We replaced the old sloppy joints with really nice solid heim joints that took out all the slop
The heim joints are fastened with AN 365 lock nuts. They're not going anywhere.
The heim joints are fastened with AN 365 lock nuts. They're not going anywhere.
trans - IMG_7138.JPG
trans - IMG_7138.JPG
Ray shimmed the shifter perfectly, so that there is no play in it. Very nice feel to the shifting now.
Ray shimmed the shifter perfectly, so that there is no play in it. Very nice feel to the shifting now.
trans - IMG_7140.JPG
trans - IMG_7140.JPG
trans - IMG_7204.JPG
trans - IMG_7204.JPG
trans - IMG_7205.JPG
trans - IMG_7205.JPG

Fuel Filter Bracket

March 25th, 2010 No comments

My friend gave me a killer fuel filter – Mallory 3140 – but it was missing a mount bracket. I made one out of 16 gauge sheet metal.

I cut this sheet metal with an air shear
I cut this sheet metal with an air shear
On the left is my fuel filter. My friend gave it to me, but it came without a mount bracket. No problem!
On the left is my fuel filter. My friend gave it to me, but it came without a mount bracket. No problem!
I drew out the pattern, marked the line for the screw holes, and hit the hole locations with a center punch before drilling. the center punch makes drilling so much easier - the bit won't have a tendency to "walk"
I drew out the pattern, marked the line for the screw holes, and hit the hole locations with a center punch before drilling. the center punch makes drilling so much easier - the bit won't have a tendency to "walk"
bent up the back in my vise, and ... finished! I should really have made a bigger mount bracket on the back. I didn't cut enough metal initially though, and this should be good enough.
bent up the back in my vise, and ... finished! I should really have made a bigger mount bracket on the back. I didn't cut enough metal initially though, and this should be good enough.

Carb

March 25th, 2010 No comments

My friend sold me this sweet carb. It’s a Holley 4150 that’s been rebuilt by The Carb Shop to their stage III race carb specs.  I did some rebuild work on it – replaced gaskets, cleaned all the old varnish out, replaced the power valve and accelerator pump diaphragms, replaced the fuel sight windows.  I also tapped and helicoiled the air filter mount and set the accelerator pump clearances.

I cleaned out all the old gas varnish with q-tips and carb cleaner.
I cleaned out all the old gas varnish with q-tips and carb cleaner.
With the throttle valves removed, this is the bottom of the carb
With the throttle valves removed, this is the bottom of the carb
This is a really nice carb that my friend gave me a great deal on. It's a Holley 4150, but it's been rebuild by The Carburetor Shop to their Stage III race carb specs.
This is a really nice carb that my friend gave me a great deal on. It's a Holley 4150, but it's been rebuild by The Carburetor Shop to their Stage III race carb specs.
carefully cleaned off the old gasket material from the metering blocks
carefully cleaned off the old gasket material from the metering blocks
These old accelerator pump diaphragms have seen better days. replaced!
These old accelerator pump diaphragms have seen better days. replaced!
Shiny new accelerator pump diaphragm
Shiny new accelerator pump diaphragm
After installing the new accelerator pump diaphragm, I set the travel of the pump actuator. Set the carb to Wide Open Throttle, push the pump arm to full on, and set the screw so that there is .015 clearance. This prevents you from tearing the diaphragm at WOT.
After installing the new accelerator pump diaphragm, I set the travel of the pump actuator. Set the carb to Wide Open Throttle, push the pump arm to full on, and set the screw so that there is .015 clearance. This prevents you from tearing the diaphragm at WOT.
The air filter mount bracket was stripped out. This 1/4x20 Helicoil took care of that no problem.
The air filter mount bracket was stripped out. This 1/4x20 Helicoil took care of that no problem.
Carb put together. You can see I removed an unused vaccuum port and put in a 1/8 NPT set screw in its place as a plug.
Carb put together. You can see I removed an unused vaccuum port and put in a 1/8 NPT set screw in its place as a plug.
Categories: Engine and Drivetrain, Fuel, Photos Tags:

Engine Work Continues

January 30th, 2010 No comments

These are some of the latest from the engine project. Dad and I are working on it with Ray at his place.

Categories: Engine and Drivetrain, Photos Tags:

Dims of my current headers

December 6th, 2009 No comments

I’m going to have to replace my headers, but I thought I would go ahead and measure my current Doug Thorley Tri-Y style headers so that Scott can see if my current ones will do in a pinch. Here are the current dims:

I first measured the primary tubes. I measured them from the top, so it’s longer than from the side or bottom, but it was the most accessible, and it’s at least consistent. I’ll list the primary tube length, which is from the non-gasket side of the flange, to the first weld joint where they go into the secondary tubes. I’ll also list the overall length, which includes the length from header gasket to collector gasket. Besides the primary tubes, I measured the other tubing on the side of the bend so that’s more neutral.

1: Primary: 11.75, OAL: 39.3
2: Primary: 9.5, OAL: 37
3: Primary: 11, OAL: 33
4: Primary: 11, OAL: 33
5: Primary: 14.25, OAL: 39
6: Primary: 14.25, OAL: 34
7: Primary: 9.25, OAL: 36.55
8: Primary: 9, OAL: 31.3

Collector Length: 5.25
Collector ID: 2.35-2.4
Primary OD: 1.5
Secondary OD: 1.75

Primary tube openings at header gasket: 1.15-1.25 W x 1.6 H

1,2 share a secondary. 2,4 also
5,7 share a secondary. 6,8 also

new radiator received

October 22nd, 2009 No comments

Old radiator on the right, new Howe Racing radiator on the left. Double the HP requires a cooling upgrade

Old radiator on the right, new Howe Racing radiator on the left. Double the HP requires a cooling upgrade

Categories: Engine and Drivetrain, Photos Tags:

Some new engine parts

October 17th, 2009 No comments