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Archive for May, 2010

X Pipe

May 30th, 2010 No comments

I am installing a Dr Gas Crossover Pipe. This will help equalize the pressure between the 2 sides of the exhaust. This should add a bit of torque, and also quiet the exhaust down a little. I got the measurements from Scott on where exactly it needed to be (and not be) to optimize the torque curve. Amazingly, I’ve been able to nail the placement of the center of the X very close to ideal, about 35.9 inches from the ends of the primaries inside the header. This got a little interesting, because since the primaries on the left and right are different lengths, the collectors are different lengths as well.

I pulled a rookie move when I welded the center section together – I welded it all on one side and then the other. MIG gets really hot, so the metal warped a bit and threw off my nice fitment job.  I muscled it into place anyway. Hopefully that will work out.

new exhaust - IMG_7434.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7434.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7435.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7435.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7436.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7436.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7437.JPG
new exhaust - IMG_7437.JPG

Fuel Lines

May 26th, 2010 No comments

I re-did all my fuel lines. Earlier, I described that I’d used the hard line, and then mated -6 fittings and braided line to it. Turns out I need -8 to fully supply this motor, so I re-did them all. Finding a route that stayed away from heat, was well protected, and wasn’t inside the car, was a challenge, but I think I did pretty well with it. In 2 areas, I passed the line through sheetmetal. Ordinarily, you’d do that with a bulkhead fitting. These areas would be pretty hard to reach though (if not impossible) with the car together, so tightening the fittings to solve a leak or something would be really hard. I ended up putting a rubber grommet in the sheet metal, and putting heat-shrink tubing on the fuel line. If I hadn’t put the heat-shrink on there, the line would have ended up cutting trough the rubber in time, and then cutting into the sheet metal. It might also be weakened itself, by the sheet metal rubbing on it. Combining that with mounting the line securely so that it won’t move around, makes for a pretty solid setup.

Fuel pressure regulator installed and connected
Fuel pressure regulator installed and connected
Fuel Lines - IMG_7275.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7275.JPG
This is covered with heat shrink tubing to protect it from debris, and to keep it from rubbing through the rubber grommets where it passes through metal.
This is covered with heat shrink tubing to protect it from debris, and to keep it from rubbing through the rubber grommets where it passes through metal.
securing the line so it does not move around is key in keeping it lasting long.
securing the line so it does not move around is key in keeping it lasting long.
Fuel Lines - IMG_7279.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7279.JPG
pressure testing the lines is important
pressure testing the lines is important
Fuel Lines - IMG_7252.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7252.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7255.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7255.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7241.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7241.JPG
These Aeroquip soft jaws make the job much easier
These Aeroquip soft jaws make the job much easier
heat shrink tubing prevents it from abrating against anything - this hose will cut through other metal over time
heat shrink tubing prevents it from abrating against anything - this hose will cut through other metal over time
making large hoops to maintain the minimum bend radius of this hose
making large hoops to maintain the minimum bend radius of this hose
later on I ended up with a 30 deg fitting on the right, to ease this bend out
later on I ended up with a 30 deg fitting on the right, to ease this bend out
Fuel Lines - IMG_7246.JPG
Fuel Lines - IMG_7246.JPG
a bulkhead keeps things simple when passing through sheetmetal.
a bulkhead keeps things simple when passing through sheetmetal.
fuel tank outlet
fuel tank outlet
Categories: Fuel, Photos Tags:

Headers

May 26th, 2010 No comments

I ditched the old Doug Thorley headers because they wouldn’t work with my new motor. Too bad, because they were nicely made. I bought a set of Hooker Super Comp headers, part number 6111-HKR and have set about modifying them a bit. I ground out the tubes to match my heads’ exhaust ports, had the flange re-welded on the outside instead of just the inside, and am modifying the collectors.

The primaries on the left side are all within about .5″ of each other in length – impressive! On the right side, tubes 2-4 are close to each other, but a couple inches shorter than the left. Tube 1 is almost 5 inches longer than 2-4! It’s the best I can do, I guess. Hooker says they are “tuned” equal length primaries. I guess “equal” is relative. True equal length headers would cost a lot more. Tough to make.

To make up for the difference between left and right, I’m extending the collector .7″. The left-hand collector needs to be 18.2 past the ends of the primaries and the right hand needs to be 18.9. It’s not really possible to get very exact with it, because the ends of the primaries really vary (+- 1/8 or more). But, I’m getting real close.

Making the exhaust system is fun and challenging. I’m sore from lifting pipes into place over my head, fitting, removing, cutting pipe, lifting into place, etc. The headers are a real tight fit. The driver’s side one has to go in first. I have to lift the engine and move it over towards the passenger’s side in order for the pipes to clear the steering box and shock tower on the way in. Luckily I did install some Ron Morris engine mounts that allow for side to side and front to back adjustment. So, lift, move, put the header up and a couple bolts in, then shift the motor back to center and drop it. Then install the passenger’s side. It all has to be done multiple times in the fitting process.

headers - IMG_7271.JPG
headers - IMG_7271.JPG
headers - IMG_7272.JPG
headers - IMG_7272.JPG
I ground out the tubes to match the large exhaust ports of my AFR heads
I ground out the tubes to match the large exhaust ports of my AFR heads
I had my engine builder, Bob Gromm, TIG the flanges on the outside with phosphor bronze. This makes them strong, and seals up the thin areas left by my grinding
I had my engine builder, Bob Gromm, TIG the flanges on the outside with phosphor bronze. This makes them strong, and seals up the thin areas left by my grinding
This is the stock collector that comes with the Hooker Super Comp 6111-HKR. It's too short and too big for my application.
This is the stock collector that comes with the Hooker Super Comp 6111-HKR. It's too short and too big for my application.
I cut and deburred the collector and prepared it for welding
I cut and deburred the collector and prepared it for welding
This is the header next to my new collector pipe. The new pipe has a slightly smaller ID, which should be better for my torque curve.
This is the header next to my new collector pipe. The new pipe has a slightly smaller ID, which should be better for my torque curve.
I ground the edges of this down a bit because it's a thicker gauge than the old collector and I thought they should match up.
I ground the edges of this down a bit because it's a thicker gauge than the old collector and I thought they should match up.
tacking the new collector to the old. I cut off a piece of the reducer to use as a joining band
tacking the new collector to the old. I cut off a piece of the reducer to use as a joining band
headers - IMG_7432.JPG
headers - IMG_7432.JPG
new collectors with ball and cone adapters, tacked together
new collectors with ball and cone adapters, tacked together
headers - IMG_7439.JPG
headers - IMG_7439.JPG
headers - IMG_7440.JPG
headers - IMG_7440.JPG
headers - IMG_7441.JPG
headers - IMG_7441.JPG