Carb

March 25th, 2010

My friend sold me this sweet carb. It’s a Holley 4150 that’s been rebuilt by The Carb Shop to their stage III race carb specs.  I did some rebuild work on it – replaced gaskets, cleaned all the old varnish out, replaced the power valve and accelerator pump diaphragms, replaced the fuel sight windows.  I also tapped and helicoiled the air filter mount and set the accelerator pump clearances.

I cleaned out all the old gas varnish with q-tips and carb cleaner.
I cleaned out all the old gas varnish with q-tips and carb cleaner.
With the throttle valves removed, this is the bottom of the carb
With the throttle valves removed, this is the bottom of the carb
This is a really nice carb that my friend gave me a great deal on. It's a Holley 4150, but it's been rebuild by The Carburetor Shop to their Stage III race carb specs.
This is a really nice carb that my friend gave me a great deal on. It's a Holley 4150, but it's been rebuild by The Carburetor Shop to their Stage III race carb specs.
carefully cleaned off the old gasket material from the metering blocks
carefully cleaned off the old gasket material from the metering blocks
These old accelerator pump diaphragms have seen better days. replaced!
These old accelerator pump diaphragms have seen better days. replaced!
Shiny new accelerator pump diaphragm
Shiny new accelerator pump diaphragm
After installing the new accelerator pump diaphragm, I set the travel of the pump actuator. Set the carb to Wide Open Throttle, push the pump arm to full on, and set the screw so that there is .015 clearance. This prevents you from tearing the diaphragm at WOT.
After installing the new accelerator pump diaphragm, I set the travel of the pump actuator. Set the carb to Wide Open Throttle, push the pump arm to full on, and set the screw so that there is .015 clearance. This prevents you from tearing the diaphragm at WOT.
The air filter mount bracket was stripped out. This 1/4x20 Helicoil took care of that no problem.
The air filter mount bracket was stripped out. This 1/4x20 Helicoil took care of that no problem.
Carb put together. You can see I removed an unused vaccuum port and put in a 1/8 NPT set screw in its place as a plug.
Carb put together. You can see I removed an unused vaccuum port and put in a 1/8 NPT set screw in its place as a plug.

Engine and Drivetrain, Fuel, Photos

Transmission tunnel repair

February 19th, 2010

So, a previous owner installed some kind of wacky shifter. In order to make room for it, they cut a big chunk out of the frame that goes across the transmission tunnel. Since I’m trying to strengthen everything now, I am going to change the shifter out, and Ray and I will build some custom shift linkage (more pics of that later) that will fit better. We’ll bend our own rods, and use rod ends instead of the stock shift linkage mounts.

Because we’ll be making the new linkage and replacing the shifter, I repaired the hole in the frame. That will certainly make things stiffer, since it’s one of the few crossmembers that exist in this old unibody car.

Photos, Sheet Metal ,

Engine Work Continues

January 30th, 2010

These are some of the latest from the engine project. Dad and I are working on it with Ray at his place.

Engine and Drivetrain, Photos

Seam Welding Frame Rails

December 14th, 2009

Taking another page from Ray’s book, I’ve decided to do some seam welding. I’m doing 1″ welds, a couple inches apart, along some of the frame rails, where they meet the body panels. I guess the stock spot-welds aren’t that great as far as torsional rigidity. anyway it’s an easy enough way to add some stiffness into the body. I’m also going to weld the shock towers. There is bracing where the control arm fasteners come through the shock towers. It’s spot-welded in place and since I’m going to be asking a lot more of those joints with the larger tires and the higher speed corners on the track, I’ll go ahead and weld around those seams as well. I might not worry about it with the frame rails that I already welded to the new floor pans, because I know I welded those really strong.

Exterior, Sheet Metal ,

Suspension Mounts Finally Welded In

December 6th, 2009

I have FINALLY finished welding in the rear suspension mounts. Most of it went well. On the driver’s side I blew through the frame rail and had to build it up. The result is ugly as sin, but will hold the thing in place.

Now it’s getting cold out in the garage! Harder to get motivated to go out and work on the car. Actually this project is feeling like such a long one that sometimes I have difficulty working up the motivation to go out and work on it. I know it’s on the down-hill side of it now though.

Dad and I will be working on the motor at Ray’s over the weekend of the 19th. I can’t wait to get that together and get this thing running!

Suspension and Brakes

Dims of my current headers

December 6th, 2009

I’m going to have to replace my headers, but I thought I would go ahead and measure my current Doug Thorley Tri-Y style headers so that Scott can see if my current ones will do in a pinch. Here are the current dims:

I first measured the primary tubes. I measured them from the top, so it’s longer than from the side or bottom, but it was the most accessible, and it’s at least consistent. I’ll list the primary tube length, which is from the non-gasket side of the flange, to the first weld joint where they go into the secondary tubes. I’ll also list the overall length, which includes the length from header gasket to collector gasket. Besides the primary tubes, I measured the other tubing on the side of the bend so that’s more neutral.

1: Primary: 11.75, OAL: 39.3
2: Primary: 9.5, OAL: 37
3: Primary: 11, OAL: 33
4: Primary: 11, OAL: 33
5: Primary: 14.25, OAL: 39
6: Primary: 14.25, OAL: 34
7: Primary: 9.25, OAL: 36.55
8: Primary: 9, OAL: 31.3

Collector Length: 5.25
Collector ID: 2.35-2.4
Primary OD: 1.5
Secondary OD: 1.75

Primary tube openings at header gasket: 1.15-1.25 W x 1.6 H

1,2 share a secondary. 2,4 also
5,7 share a secondary. 6,8 also

Engine and Drivetrain , ,

Adjusting the Koni Shocks

November 2nd, 2009

I paid a visit to Ray this past weekend, and he told me the adjustments to make on the Koni Classic shocks. Initially, I’d just put them in the middle of their range. He’d spent some development time on his car though, and determined that the appropriate adjustment for our cars would be:

Rear: 1 turn in from softest

Front: 2 turns in from softest

So what you do is push the shock all the way closed and turn CCW until it stops. That’s the limit on the soft side. Turn CW 2 for front and 1 for rear shocks.

In the rear, I was in luck, because the rear end is still down and the shocks were just hanging down. I guess what you’d do though, is just undo the bottom mounting nut and push it closed from the bottom.

In the front, I had to remove not only the top shock to shock collar fasteners, but also the shock collar nuts. I had to take out the Monte Carlo bar as well, because the tops of the shocks would not push down past rim of the Monte Carlo bar.

When I did this, it exposed a mistake that I had made when I put them in in the first place. The bottom mounts weren’t tight at all! I had tightened the bottom shock mount nuts with the top ones already tightened. Since the mounting surface on the bottom is a bit tilted, and spring-loaded, tightening the top first didn’t allow the bottom ones to sit flush with the mount surface. It gave me a false torque reading. Glad I checked that.

Suspension and Brakes ,

new radiator received

October 22nd, 2009

Old radiator on the right, new Howe Racing radiator on the left. Double the HP requires a cooling upgrade

Old radiator on the right, new Howe Racing radiator on the left. Double the HP requires a cooling upgrade

Engine and Drivetrain, Photos

Some new engine parts

October 17th, 2009

Engine and Drivetrain, Photos , , , ,

Cooling this thing

September 25th, 2009

As my motor gets closer to coming together, I realize I need to get a cooling solution together too. Ray said my old radiator setup won’t work – it will overheat. Actually, he told me to “get into the new millenium” and buy a Howe Racing radiator. So, he gave the the part numbers for his cooling setup, which never overheats, even with his nearly 600HP motor on 100 degree days. So I’ll be getting a Howe Racing 342A Aluminum crossflow radiator. It will require a bit of customization of the mounting area to fit it, but it will be worth it. I’ll also be adding an electric fan, to replace the big crank-driven one that I currently have. This should be more efficient at moving the right amount of air through (it will be 2000CFM) and it will free up about 15HP since the crank doesn’t have to drive the old fan anymore.

Engine and Drivetrain, Photos , ,